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Modern Jewish Witchcraft Appears In Jewelry

Hamsas
Jewish Amulet Sweeps Israel

What is an "amulet?"  It is any religious object that a person believes gives them protection and wards off evil.  Amulets can come in many forms, shapes, and designs.  The amulet is bestowed certain powers and a person wearing them are thought to possess this power by the presence of it.  Amulets are worn usually in some form of jewelry.  There are finger rings, bracelets, earrings, necklaces, arm bands, and broaches, to name only a few.  Some wear a wedding band feeling that its presence wards off adultery and gives the public the message "I am married so don't think I am available for sexual favors."  Some wear earrings because the design somehow wards off bad news and keeps the soul from hearing the voice of demons and the devil.  Some wear bracelets and necklaces because they believe the emblem they wear upon them gives them protection.  Today the amulet may come in several forms.  In Israel the "Hamsas" amulet is now a hot item of religios jewelry.

The Hamsas is a hand-shaped pin and was designed by an Israeli artist named Yossi Steinberg.  Its purpose was not only to ward off evil but to bring together Jews, Christians, and Moslems.  People feel the need to be protected and so they are buying this piece of jewelry like mad.  After the September 11 attack in America many felt they could escape being a victim of future acts of terrorism if they wore this magic pin.  Cash registers are registering large sales throughout Israel.  There are now wall hangings in many designs using the Hamsas image.  Key chains are being manufactured with this emblem.  According to Mr. Steinberg the magical hand represents God as the creator.  The eye in the middle is said to be God's watchful eye upon all about you.  And should this magical eye see something in your future it will either give you some inner message or it will ward off any evil seen and unseen.  Muslims are buying this piece of jewelry believing it is the magical hand of Fatima, the daughter of Mohammed.  Many Jews call it the magical hand of Miriam.  It is being compared to the Cross which Christians wear.  Since Jews and Islamics will not wear the Cross because it reminds them of Jesus whom they hate, they place in this amulet the same faith as those who wear the Christian Cross.  Some believe that this hand represents the protection afforded in the Hexagram.  Those who wear it claim it is just like an angel pin that Christians wear.  It represents that they have divine protection and gives them faith and personal commitment.  Hamsas translates then into the idea of personalized spirituality.  It is considered a religious item and any superstitution attached to it is good.  Rabbi Max Weiman, a teacher in St. Louis with Aish HaTorah, a Jewish adult education outreach program said: "Whether something is a religous item or a matter of superstitution depends on wheter or not you think God really runs the world. If God dosen't really run the world, you might need a good luck charm."

What we are seeing and have seen in past generations is the spread of religious jewelry that supposedly carries some form of protection power with it.  A wedding ring does not ward off fornication or adultery.  Wearing an angel upon a bracelet, necklace, or earring, offers no protection to the person wearing it. Having a magic amulet on the wall of a home does not give it protection.  Images of Jesus or the so-called saints cannot add protection to the home. There is not a single piece of Jewelry that can offer the person wearing it any protection whatsoever.

The Hamsas is nothing but a piece of witchcraft jewelry.  It does not represent God because God does not use jewelry to give any power to the one wearing it special protection.  All forms of jewelry including wedding bands should be rejected by those who believe in Jesus the Messiah and King of Israel.  Even the blessings of Rabbis cannot make this demonic piece of jewelry holy.

Were there is jewelry there are demon spirits.

Pastor Reckart

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